The StartUp Curve

The StartUp Curve

4 Principles of Great Design for Everyone

1. SIMULTANEOUSLY EMBRACE DESIRES & CONSTRAINTS

Create a solution that embraces and satisfies constraints & desires. It must be simultaneous. One cannot ignore the other.

2. MINIMIZE RESOURCE INEFFICIENCIES

Start with a systematic analysis of the product. Use first principles to reinvent problematic aspects. 

3. OPTIMIZE VALUE

Provide the maximum functional, social, and emotional value for a minimum initial investment and low long-term maintenance cost.

4. DIGNIFY EVERYONE

We are all human. Do not discriminate based on geography, culture, or economic status. A homeless person and the President should be treated equally.

“I think it’s important to reason from first principles rather than by analogy. The normal way we conduct our lives is we reason by analogy. [With analogy] we are doing this because it’s like something else that was done, or it is like what other people are doing. [With first principles] you boil things down to the most fundamental truths…and then reason up from there.”

Everyone Deserves Great Design

Paris in Motion (Part 1)

Source: vimeo.com

Paris in Motion (Part 2)

Source: vimeo.com

Paris in Motion (Part 3)

Source: vimeo.com

Paris in Motion (Part 4)

Source: vimeo.com
      In organizations (or even in a society) where culture is weak, you need an abundance of heavy, precise rules and processes.
Source: medium.com
      He encourages thinking based on “first principles” — boiling a situation down to its basic, fundamental truths and then reasoning up from there
Source: 99u.com
The real measure of your wealth is how much you’d be worth if you lost all your money

The real measure of your wealth is how much you’d be worth if you lost all your money

Reblogged from: rude-mechanicals
Source: thinksquad
Explain please!

Explain please!

      That is, of course, the irony of the patent system. Without patent protection, a competitor can simply replicate an invention and undercut the inventor’s price — which necessarily includes all the time and expense of research and development — so the incentive to experiment and create is severely inhibited. But if innovators such as Glenn Curtiss cannot build on the progress of others without paying exorbitantly for the privilege, the incentive to continue to experiment and create is similarly inhibited.

It is our view that morally the world owes its almost universal system of lateral control entirely to us. It is also our opinion that legally it owes it to us.